THE EXILES (1961)

The Exiles 1a.jpg

THE EXILES

  • dir. KENT MACKENZIE
  • year. 1961
  • country. USA
  • run-time. 72min
  • rating. 12

+ LEGACY OF EXILED NDNZ

  • dir. PAMELA J. PETERS
  • year. 2014
  • country. USA
  • run-time. 14 min
  • rating. 12

£5.00 (£3.50 conc.)

Doors 7:00PM - Film 7:30PM


Chronicling a night in the lives of young Native Americans living in Los Angeles' famed Bunker Hill district, The Exiles follows a group of exiles – transplants from Southwest reservations – as they flirt, drink, party, fight and dance. With its vivid, high-contrast black and white photography and fantastic soundtrack, Kent Mackenzie's gritty depiction of this marginalized Los Angeles community - based on interviews - draws comparisons to John Cassavetes, Charles Burnett and Vittorio De Sica. First shown at the 1961 Venice Film Festival, and featured in Thom Andersen's documentary Los Angeles Plays Itself (2003), it was restored by the UCLA Film and Television Archive in 2008.

+ Legacy of Exiled NDNZ

Influenced by The Exiles, Legacy of Exiled NDNZ looks at the lives of young American Indians of various tribes (Navajo, Cherokee, Seminole, Barona Bands of Mission Indians and Lakota) who migrated from their reservations or are the children of families that relocated from tribal reservations through the Bureau of Indian Affairs’ (BIA) Relocation program during the late 1950s and 1960s.

With thanks to Native Spirit Foundation and with kind permission of Pamela J. Peters. More information can be found at exiledndnz.com, gofundme.com/ExiledNDNZ and @NavajoFilmmaker  

An acute, great-looking, doggedly noncommittal view of a culture just one step up from the lower depths... Few fiction or nonfiction films nail the sense of place and time as palpably as this one does.
— TIME
Energy and poetry... the impression is of a proto-beatnik brotherhood... anything but depressing or admonitory
— The Guardian
Poetic and empathetic... conjures a powerful sensation of purgatory... a history not so much secret as occluded: a subculture and a way of life that has been virtually invisible.
— The New York Times